Spectrum Shuttle, 10 picosecond to 10 nanosecond pulses – Enerzine

The “Spectrum Shuttle” technique: a new approach to generating and manipulating high-repetition pulses

In the world of science and technology, the generation and manipulation of high repetition frequency pulses are topics of great interest. A research team from the University of Tokyo and Saitama University recently developed an innovative optical technique called “Spectrum Shuttle.” This technique allows the simultaneous generation of high-repetition pulses and the individual modulation of their spatial profiles.

The “Spectrum Shuttle” method

In the “spectrum shuttle” method, an ultra-short pulse is scattered horizontally by diffraction gratings and the pulse is spatially divided into different wavelengths using parallel mirrors. These vertically aligned pulses undergo individual spatial modulation using a spatial light modulator.

The resulting modulated pulses with different time delays in the GHz range produce pulses with high spectral repetition, each with a unique spatial shape.

As reported in the journal Advanced Photonics NexusThe proposed method successfully generated high-repetition pulses with discretely different wavelengths and time intervals. It demonstrated the ability to modulate spatial profiles, including position shifts and peak splitting.

Possible applications

Method enables ultrafast imaging on time scales Subnanoseconds to nanoseconds, which allows the analysis of fast and non-repetitive phenomena. Its potential applications include the discovery of unknown ultrafast phenomena and the monitoring of fast physical processes in industrial environments.

The possibility of individually modulating pulses with a high repetition frequency also offers interesting perspectives in the field of precision laser treatment and laser therapy.

In particular, the compact design of the proposed method improves its portability and makes it applicable in various scientific research institutions and various industrial technology areas.

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The innovative “Spectrum Shuttle” technology opens up opportunities for the further development of ultrafast imaging with implications for scientific research and industrial applications. Its ability to simultaneously generate and modulate high-repetition pulses represents a versatile tool for studying fast phenomena and improving laser-based processes.

For better understanding

What is the “Spectrum Shuttle” technique?

The “Spectrum Shuttle” technique is an optical process that enables the simultaneous generation of highly repetitive pulses and the individual modulation of their spatial profiles.

What are the advantages of this technique?

It enables ultra-fast imaging on time scales Subnanoseconds to nanoseconds and allows the analysis of fast and non-repetitive phenomena. In addition, the compact design improves portability.

What are the possible applications of this technique?

Potential applications include the discovery of unknown ultrafast phenomena, monitoring rapid physical processes in industrial environments, precision laser processing, and laser therapy.

What are the results of applying this technique?

The method successfully generated pulses with a high repetition rate and discretely different wavelengths and time intervals. It also demonstrated the ability to modulate spatial profiles.

Who developed this technology?

The technique was developed by a research team from the University of Tokyo and Saitama University.

References

Article: Shimada et al., “Spectrum shuttle for generating spatially shapeable GHz burst pulses,” Adv. Photon. Nexus 3(1), 016002 (2024), doi 10.1117/1.APN.3.1.016002

Caption: The proposed “Spectral Shuttle” method generates gigahertz (GHz) burst pulses from an ultrashort pulse, with each pulse having a different wavelength and a customizable spatial profile. These GHz burst pulses pave the way for a variety of optical applications, including ultra-fast imaging in the GHz range and high-quality, high-throughput laser processing with ultra-short laser pulse bursts. Photo credit: K. Nakagawa (University of Tokyo).

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